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Michigan judge orders release of Oxford school shooting evidence, including surveillance footage

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Michigan judge orders release of Oxford school shooting evidence, including surveillance footage

Oakland County Circuit Judge Rae Lee Chabot signed an order Thursday requiring the Oakland County Sheriff’s office, the county and the Oxford Community School District to release evidence, including video footage, related to the November school shooting at Oxford High School in Michigan.

The ruling was made as part of a civil lawsuit brought by families of victims of the shooting against school officials, accused shooter Ethan Crumbley and his parents. Court documents show that the victims’ families subpoenaed records related to the shooting and surrounding events, but the school district did not hand over the documents by the deadline set.

Ethan Crumbley, a student at the school, is charged with 24 counts after he allegedly shot and killed four of his classmates on Nov. 30.

His parents, Jennifer and James Crumbley, are also charged with four counts of involuntary manslaughter after allegedly failing to recognize warning signs about their son in the months before the shooting.

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All three Crumbleys have pleaded not guilty. Judge Kwame Rowe on Thursday postponed Ethan Crumbley’s trial to next year.

The families of the victims had asked Judge Chabot to order the school district, Oakland County and the Oakland County Sheriff’s department to hand over evidence.

Parents walk away with their kids from the Meijer’s parking lot in Oxford where many students gathered following an active shooter situation at Oxford High School in Oxford, Mich., Nov. 30, 2021.

Detroit Free Press via USA Today Network, FILE

The district and sheriff’s department had filed requests to stop the release of the evidence, but Chabot denied those requests.

“We fully expect that Oxford Community Schools, Oakland County/Oakland County Sheriff’s Office will fully comply with the law and Judge Chabot’s order. Our clients have waited over seven months to see the full and complete investigation with their own eyes; that’s long enough,” Ven Johnson an attorney for the victims families said in a statement to ABC News.

Sheriff Michael Bouchard, whose department has led the investigation into the shooting, told ABC News that he will meet with lawyers before settling on a timeline for the release of the footage.

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Bouchard said he has no issue following the judge’s order, but expressed concern that publicizing the video might complicate efforts to sit juries in the trials against the alleged shooter and his parents, both of which are scheduled for later this year.

The decision came as the Oxford Community School District said Wednesday that it hired Guidepost Solutions and Varnum law to investigate the events surrounding the shooting. The district said it will make all materials and information available to the investigative team.

The district said Guidepost will share the report with the community at the same time it is shared with the board and school administration.

“Of course, independent investigations like these take time, and we will not sacrifice the integrity of the investigation with an artificial timeline.  With that said, the investigation team is getting in place, getting up to speed, and getting ready to begin – and they will conduct and complete their work with deliberate care and speed,” Tom Donnelly, the school board president, said in a letter to the community.

The district said it will also launch a website that covers its response to the shooting that it expects to be live in about a month. It also set up a secure email that would allow students, family members and members of the community to share information or request a meeting with investigators.

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Disaster

At least 1 dead, 44 injured after tornado strikes northern Michigan

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At least 1 dead, 44 injured after tornado strikes northern Michigan

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One person died, multiple people were injured and “heavy damage” reported after a destructive tornado tore through northern Michigan Friday afternoon, authorities said.

A Munson Healthcare spokesman confirmed that there had been one death and 44 injuries. The spokesperson could not speak to the severity of the injuries.

The injured are being treated at four separate hospitals. 23 patients have been admitted at Otsego Memorial Hospital, 12 patients at Grayling Hospital, eight patients at McLaren Northern Michigan Petoskey, and one patient Munson Medical Center Traverse City.

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Michigan State Police for the Seventh District confirmed that a tornado touched down in Otsego County.

“Trees and power lines blocking roadways. Multiple homes and businesses damaged,” the agency said on Twitter. “Avoid the Gaylord area. Emergency crews are responding.”

In this image provided by Steven Bischer, damage is shown following an apparent tornado, on May 20, 2022, in Gaylord, Mich. (Steven Bischer via AP)
In this image provided by Steven Bischer, damage is shown following an apparent tornado, on May 20, 2022, in Gaylord, Mich. (teven Bischer via AP)

State police said there was “heavy damage” throughout the area and that an unspecified number of people were transported to local hospitals with injuries.

Residents in Gaylord are asked to shelter in place through 8 a.m. Saturday due to the “ongoing emergency,” state police said.

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Images from the scene showed leveled buildings, damaged roofs on businesses, downed trees and cars flipped over.

“My heart goes out to the families and small businesses impacted by the tornado and severe weather in Gaylord,” Michigan Gov. Gretchen Whitmer said on Twitter. “To the entire Gaylord community — Michigan is with you. We will do what it takes to rebuild.”

A severe thunderstorm watch had been issued for the region through the evening, with the National Weather Service warning that “an isolated tornado cannot be ruled out in the greater area.”

William Gretsky contributed to this report.

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The post At least 1 dead, 44 injured after tornado strikes northern Michigan first appeared on WebChennel.

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Tornado strikes through northern Michigan community

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Tornado strikes through northern Michigan community

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GAYLORD, Mich. — A tornado struck Michigan’s northern Lower Peninsula on Friday, flipping recreational vehicles in a small community, partially tearing the roof off at least one building and causing other damage.

There were no immediate reports of injuries or deaths caused by the tornado that hit Gaylord, a community of roughly 4,200 people about 230 miles (370 kilometers) northwest of Detroit.

Eddie Thrasher, 55, said he was sitting in his car outside an auto parts store when the tornado seemed to appear above him.

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“There are roofs ripped off businesses, a row of industrial-type warehouses,” Thrasher said. “RVs were flipped upside down and destroyed. There were a lot of emergency vehicles heading from the east side of town.”

He said he ran into the auto parts store to ride it out.

“My adrenaline was going like crazy,” Thrasher said. “In less than five minuets it was over.”

Images shared on social media showed what appeared to be multiple RVs in a parking lot that were destroyed and left in pieces, and a portion of a roof ripped off a large building.

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Gaylord, known as the “Alpine Village,” is set to celebrate its 100th birthday this year, with a centennial celebration that will include a parade and open house at City Hall later this summer. Gaylord also is host to the annual Alpenfest in July, what it describes as an “Alpine-inspired celebration” honoring the city’s heritage and a partnership with a sister city in Switzerland.

The post Tornado strikes through northern Michigan community first appeared on WebChennel.

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Protesters shut down city meeting demanding justice for Patrick Lyoya

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Protesters shut down city meeting demanding justice for Patrick Lyoya

Protesters shut down a Grand Rapids City Commission meeting on Tuesday, demanding justice for Patrick Lyoya, who was shot and killed by a Michigan police officer earlier this month.

During the commission’s public comment period, several people took to the stand to call for police accountability. As protesters began to shout, Mayor Rosalynn Bliss said the commission will be taking a recess, an online recording of the meeting shows.

Bliss adjourned the meeting as the commotion continued, a spokesperson for the city told ABC News. Commissioners and most city staff left the chambers about five to 10 minutes later, according to local outlet MLive.

Grand Rapids Police Chief Eric Winstrom later took questions from protesters, who largely voiced their concerns, according to MLive. The meeting ended at 9 p.m. and Winstrom stayed to speak with residents until nearly 11 p.m., according to the spokesperson. Protesters left peacefully and no arrests were made, the spokesperson added.

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WATCH | The Grand Rapids City Commission meeting ends after one of the public comment speakers starts approaching Chief Winstrom. pic.twitter.com/I0XYSvt877

— Marisa Oberle (@marisa_oberleTV) April 27, 2022

Winstrom told FOX17 he was not surprised by what had happened at the meeting.

“I’ve been in this situation before, where, people want to scream and yell,” said Winstrom. “It looked to me like it was a group of people who wanted to vent.”

Winstrom added, “Sometimes people want to sit at the table, the seat at the table, they want their voice to be heard and they want to have a discussion and then other times they just want to vent. It sounded to me after the first couple of speakers people just wanted to scream and yell.”

Lyoya, 26, was shot by an officer following a struggle outside a house after he was pulled over for a faulty license plate, according to body cam footage and police.

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Amid the struggle, the officer was able to force Lyoya to the ground, shouting, “Stop resisting,” “Let go” and “Drop the Taser” before he shot Lyoya in the back of the head, according to video footage.

Earlier this week, police named Christopher Schurr as the officer who shot Lyoya.

Protesters are demanding that Schurr be arrested and officers get their own liability insurance. They also want Kent County prosecutor Chris Becker to remove himself from deciding whether to charge Schurr, according to MLive.

Grand Rapids Police did not immediately respond to ABC News’ request for comment.

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