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Number Of Busted Illegal Crypto Mining Farms In Iran Nears 7,000

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Number Of Busted Illegal Crypto Mining Farms In Iran Nears 7,000

Authorities in Iran have shut down close to 7,000 unauthorized facilities for cryptocurrency mining in the past two years, local media revealed. According to a report, most of the illegal bitcoin farms were concentrated in five provinces of the Islamic Republic, including Tehran.

Iran Continues Crackdown on Unlicensed Cryptocurrency Mining

Iranian officials have unplugged and disbanded a total of 6,914 crypto farms operating without a mining license. This since authorities started clamping down on the illegal extraction of cryptocurrencies in 2020, the English-language Iranian daily Financial Tribune unveiled this week.

The newspaper quotes a report by Iribnews.ir, which details that these facilities have burned some 645 megawatts of electrical power while minting digital currencies without permission. It has been estimated this equals the annual consumption of three major regions — North Khorasan, South Khorasan, and Chaharmahal-Bakhtiari.

Cryptocurrency mining has been a legal industrial activity in Iran for almost three years now, after the government approved regulations for the sector in July 2019. A licensing regime was introduced and companies that want to get involved in the business need to obtain authorization from the Ministry of Industries.

However, as registered crypto miners are required to buy the electrical energy they need at higher, export rates, many Iranian miners have opted to remain under the radar. They usually connect illegally to the grid and use subsidized electricity to power their mining hardware.

Iran’s Power Generation, Distribution, and Transmission Company (Tavanir) has been going after underground crypto farms, closing them down and confiscating hundreds of thousands of mining machines. If identified, their operators can be fined for damages inflicted on the distribution network and a report revealed last month that the government is preparing to increase the penalties.

The country’s electricity shortages last summer were partially blamed on increased electricity usage for coin minting and even licensed miners were asked to shut down their equipment. They were allowed to resume operations in September but then again ordered to suspend activities in the face of a growing power deficit in the cold winter months.

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Do you expect Iran to continue to crack down on unlicensed crypto mining? Tell us in the comments section below.

Lubomir Tassev

Lubomir Tassev is a journalist from tech-savvy Eastern Europe who likes Hitchens’s quote: “Being a writer is what I am, rather than what I do.” Besides crypto, blockchain and fintech, international politics and economics are two other sources of inspiration.

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Disclaimer: This article is for informational purposes only. It is not a direct offer or solicitation of an offer to buy or sell, or a recommendation or endorsement of any products, services, or companies. Bitcoin.com does not provide investment, tax, legal, or accounting advice. Neither the company nor the author is responsible, directly or indirectly, for any damage or loss caused or alleged to be caused by or in connection with the use of or reliance on any content, goods or services mentioned in this article.

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Russia’s Anti-Monopoly Agency Proposes Higher Electricity Rates For Home Crypto Miners

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Russia’s Anti-Monopoly Agency Proposes Higher Electricity Rates For Home Crypto Miners

The anti-monopoly service of Russia has suggested that Russians minting digital currencies at their homes should pay more for the spent electrical energy. The proposal comes after the submission of a bill tailored to regulate cryptocurrency mining to the Russian parliament.

Russian Miners Using Household Electricity Should Pay Higher Bills, Anti-Monopoly Body Says

Russia’s Federal Anti-monopoly Service (FAS) has designed a scheme to charge amateur crypto miners increased rates for the electricity they use. The agency insists its approach to solving the problem with rising consumption in residential areas, due in part to the growing popularity of mining, can reduce the load on the electrical networks.

Authorities in the Russian Federation maintain differentiated electricity tariffs depending on the status and location of consumers, the Rossiyskaya Gazeta daily explains in an article. Businesses subsidize household prices through their own tariffs, which can be up to two times higher than the rates for the general population.

Private consumers often try to exploit their low rates to earn money by powering anything from car repair shops to woodworking shops, the Community of Energy Consumers association notes. As a result, grids in residential areas are overloaded as they are not designed to cope with the excessive power usage, which has also spiked due to home mining.

The FAS now wants to introduce a threshold for electricity consumption, above which higher rates will be imposed. Thus, according to the anti-monopoly service, household needs will be separated from commercial ones. The consumption of various household appliances, including those with increased power usage like air conditioning units, will be accounted for.

Each Russian region will be able to set the amount of electricity that will be supplied at preferential rates, taking into account factors such as power usage for heating in the cold months and the length of the heating season, the FAS pointed out. In December, the federal government allowed regional authorities to independently determine the local electricity tariffs.

Power supply networks in the residential areas of many regions with historically low electricity prices, such as Irkutsk Oblast, Krasnoyarsk Krai, and Dagestan, have suffered breakdowns due to the spread of improvised crypto mining farms minting coins in basements and garages.

The introduction of differentiated tariffs is expected to reduce interest in mining and other ways of earning at the expense of subsidized household electricity. The agency hopes the new approach can also lower production costs for businesses calculated in the prices of their goods and services, ultimately suppressing inflation.

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The proposal comes as Russian lawmakers are reviewing a new draft law on cryptocurrency mining. The legislation aims to regulate the industry in the country, which is rich in cheap energy resources and favorable climatic conditions. Its competitive advantages can potentially turn Russia into a global mining leader, officials have acknowledged.

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What are your thoughts on the new electricity pricing that will affect crypto miners in Russia? Tell us in the comments section below.

Lubomir Tassev

Lubomir Tassev is a journalist from tech-savvy Eastern Europe who likes Hitchens’s quote: “Being a writer is what I am, rather than what I do.” Besides crypto, blockchain and fintech, international politics and economics are two other sources of inspiration.

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Image Credits: Shutterstock, Pixabay, Wiki Commons

Disclaimer: This article is for informational purposes only. It is not a direct offer or solicitation of an offer to buy or sell, or a recommendation or endorsement of any products, services, or companies. Bitcoin.com does not provide investment, tax, legal, or accounting advice. Neither the company nor the author is responsible, directly or indirectly, for any damage or loss caused or alleged to be caused by or in connection with the use of or reliance on any content, goods or services mentioned in this article.

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Kazakhstan Amends Registration Rules For Cryptocurrency Miners

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Kazakhstan Amends Registration Rules For Cryptocurrency Miners

The government of Kazakhstan has revised the registration requirements for persons and companies involved in crypto mining. The updated regulations come amid an ongoing clampdown on the industry in the Central Asian nation, where the influx of miners has been blamed for persisting electricity shortages.

Crypto Miners to File Quarterly Reports With Kazakhstan Authorities

An order issued by Kazakhstan’s minister of digital development, Bagdat Musin, has expanded the registration and reporting requirements for those minting digital coins. The document obliges individual entrepreneurs and legal entities that intend to mine crypto to notify regulators at least 30 days before commencing activities. The same applies to firms and persons providing services to such enterprises.

Cryptocurrency miners are now asked to submit certain data including the name, registration number, and contact information of their companies, as well as their bank details and IP addresses. They will have to also specify the energy needs of their mining facilities, the planned investments, and the number of employees.

Among the required documents are copies of customs declarations or other proof of ownership of mining equipment, documents confirming that the persons involved in the undertaking are residents of Kazakhstan, information indicating the location of the mining farm in the country, and a technical description of how the hardware will be connected to the power grid.

Miners that have already started operations, and their providers of maintenance services, are obliged to file similar reports with the government for every quarter. Furthermore, mining entities that pull out of business will have to notify the state within ten days after terminating their activities.

The new reporting requirements come as the authorities in Nur-Sultan are clamping down on the crypto mining industry, a year after Kazakhstan became a magnet for miners amid China’s offensive against the sector. The government has been targeting illegal miners but even authorized bitcoin farms have suffered from power cuts caused by the growing electricity deficit.

The shortages have already forced some companies to leave the country while dozens of mining facilities have been shut down this year, and many of them remain unplugged. Auditors have also been trying to close tax loopholes exploited by some miners, while authorities prepare to increase the tax burden for those that remain in Kazakhstan, and intend to tie the levy to the value of the minted digital currency.

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Bitcoin, bitcoin farms, Crypto, crypto farms, crypto miners, crypto mining, Cryptocurrencies, Cryptocurrency, Government, Kazakhstan, Miners, mining, registration, Regulation, Regulations, reporting, requirements, rules

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Do you expect more crypto miners to leave Kazakhstan following the adoption of the stricter registration and reporting rules? Tell us in the comments section below.

Lubomir Tassev

Lubomir Tassev is a journalist from tech-savvy Eastern Europe who likes Hitchens’s quote: “Being a writer is what I am, rather than what I do.” Besides crypto, blockchain and fintech, international politics and economics are two other sources of inspiration.

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Image Credits: Shutterstock, Pixabay, Wiki Commons

Disclaimer: This article is for informational purposes only. It is not a direct offer or solicitation of an offer to buy or sell, or a recommendation or endorsement of any products, services, or companies. Bitcoin.com does not provide investment, tax, legal, or accounting advice. Neither the company nor the author is responsible, directly or indirectly, for any damage or loss caused or alleged to be caused by or in connection with the use of or reliance on any content, goods or services mentioned in this article.

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