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Proposed Crypto Mining Ban In Norway Fails To Gain Support In Parliament

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Proposed Crypto Mining Ban In Norway Fails To Gain Support In Parliament

A push to prohibit the energy-intensive proof-of-work mining of cryptocurrencies in Norway has been rejected by the majority of lawmakers. The ban had been suggested by the far-left Red Party which also didn’t win backing to raise an electricity tax for crypto miners.

Norway Will Not Ban Bitcoin Mining

The parliament of Norway has considered and voted against a draft law banning the minting of digital currencies based on the proof-of-work concept. The legislation, which was proposed by the communist Red Party in March, was supported only by two other leftist parties, SV (the Socialist Left Party) and MdG (the Green Party).

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“We are obviously disappointed with the majority here,” Red lawmaker Sofie Marhaug told the E24 news portal. She added that the Norwegian society must determine its priorities regarding power usage. Her party says bitcoin mining is extremely energy-intensive and insists on putting an emphasis on the needs of other industries and climate change goals.

However, as Marhaug pointed out, the majority in the Storting, Norway’s legislature, wants to prioritize the market, and “give the bill to Norwegian electricity consumers.”

The Red also failed to win support for a proposal to revise the electricity surcharge for mining data centers, accusing the Labor Party (Ap) and Centre Party (Sp) of breaching a pre-election promise. The two parties had announced they would seek a full electricity fee for mining farms.

While households, many businesses, and the public sector currently pay 0.15 kroner (approx. $0.02) per kilowatt-hour of spent electricity, the industry, including data centers, enjoys a reduced levy of just 0.0055 kroner per kWh.

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In February, the Norwegian government said it will try to avoid imposing a crypto ban, but made it clear it was considering various measures regarding the electricity consumption in the sector. In November, Norway admitted it’s mulling over ways to limit the environmental impact of bitcoin minting and may support a Swedish proposal for a European ban on proof-of-work mining.

“In a time of energy scarcity and challenges with cutting emissions, it is particularly harmful that power is wasted only to enrich individuals rather than being used for socially beneficial purposes,” the three leftist parties said. However, the parliamentary majority has objected to the politically motivated discrimination against mining data centers.

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ban, Bitcoin, Bitcoin mining, Crypto, crypto miners, crypto mining, Cryptocurrencies, Cryptocurrency, Electricity, Energy, FEE, Law, Legislation, Norway, norwegian, parliament, power, prohibition, Proof of Work, surcharge, Tax

What do you think about the debate in Norway on the future of the crypto mining industry? Share your thoughts on the subject in the comments section below.

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Lubomir Tassev

Lubomir Tassev is a journalist from tech-savvy Eastern Europe who likes Hitchens’s quote: “Being a writer is what I am, rather than what I do.” Besides crypto, blockchain and fintech, international politics and economics are two other sources of inspiration.

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Despite Criminalizing Mining, Abkhazia Uncovers Another Crypto Farm

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Despite Criminalizing Mining, Abkhazia Uncovers Another Crypto Farm

Even after introducing fines and criminal liability for cryptocurrency mining, Abkhazia continues to find underground facilities for digital currency extraction. This week, law enforcement officials have confiscated dozens of mining devices from an illegal crypto farm.

Abkhazia Shuts Down Crypto Farm, Seizes Mining Hardware

Police in Abkhazia have closed down another crypto mining installation in a rural area of the breakaway Georgian republic. The illegal coin minting facility was located in the village of Yashtuha, Sukhumi region, the Ministry of Internal Affairs announced.

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Representatives of the interior ministry, together with officials from the Department for Energy Supervision and other government agencies, raided the cryptocurrency farm on Wednesday, May 16, acting on a tip-off.

An administrative protocol has been drawn up against the miner, 29-year-old local resident Khanchalyan Robertovich. He operated 31 mining machines that have been confiscated and transferred to a government-owned warehouse.

In the past few years, many Abkhazians have turned to crypto mining as an alternative source of income. The government of the partially recognized republic in the South Caucasus has blamed the energy-intensive process for the territory’s growing electricity deficit.

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To deal with the power shortages, the Russia-backed de facto state imposed a temporary ban on crypto mining and hardware imports in 2018. Last year, the measure was extended until March 31, 2022 and then in April, prolonged until the end of this year.

Authorities in Sukhumi also introduced hefty fines and criminal liability for illegal use of electricity to produce cryptocurrencies. Mining is believed to be the main cause for the frequent breakdowns of the republic’s power distribution network.

Officials in Sukhumi have since admitted that their efforts to curb crypto mining have largely failed. Reports revealed last summer that Abkhazia had held talks with Russia in an attempt to solve its issues with electricity supply. At the time, the government was also planning to regulate the activity and ensure that miners are legally connected to the grid.

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Abkhaz, Abkhazia, Abkhazian, Abkhazians, ban, confiscated, Crypto, crypto farm, crypto miners, crypto mining, Cryptocurrencies, Cryptocurrency, deficit, Electricity, Miners, mining, Mining Devices, Mining Farm, mining machines, power, seized, shortages

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Do you expect Abkhazia to legalize cryptocurrency mining once it overcomes its electricity shortages? Tell us in the comments section below.

Lubomir Tassev

Lubomir Tassev is a journalist from tech-savvy Eastern Europe who likes Hitchens’s quote: “Being a writer is what I am, rather than what I do.” Besides crypto, blockchain and fintech, international politics and economics are two other sources of inspiration.

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Image Credits: Shutterstock, Pixabay, Wiki Commons

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Disclaimer: This article is for informational purposes only. It is not a direct offer or solicitation of an offer to buy or sell, or a recommendation or endorsement of any products, services, or companies. Bitcoin.com does not provide investment, tax, legal, or accounting advice. Neither the company nor the author is responsible, directly or indirectly, for any damage or loss caused or alleged to be caused by or in connection with the use of or reliance on any content, goods or services mentioned in this article.

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China Backed Publication: Terra LUNA Crash Vindicates Country’s Ban On Crypto-Related Activities

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China Backed Publication: Terra LUNA Crash Vindicates Country’s Ban On Crypto-Related Activities

An op-ed article published in the state-backed Chinese publication Economic Daily, has suggested that the recent crash of the Terra blockchain’s LUNA and the de-pegging of the UST stablecoin vindicate the Asian country’s decision to ban crypto-related activities. In the article, the author names the interest rate hikes by the U.S. Federal Reserve and the buying and selling of crypto assets by several investment giants as the causes of the recent market crash.

Impact of Recent US Interest Rate Hike

An author writing for China’s state-backed publication, Economic Daily, has argued that the recent crash of Terra’s LUNA and the de-pegging of the UST stablecoin vindicates his country’s decision to block or prohibit virtual currency-related activities. The author, Li Hualin, also claimed that China’s “decisive” and “timely” action helped to “extinguish the ‘virtual fire’ of virtual currency speculation and put ‘protection locks’ on investors’ wallets.”

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As reported by Bitcoin.com News, Terra blockchain’s native token LUNA’s troubles started after the network’s other project, the algorithmic stablecoin UST, lost its peg against the U.S. dollar. Initial efforts to rescue the stablecoin precipitated the native token’s plunge from a price of over $87 on May 4, 2022, to a current price of just under $0.0003.

While some crypto experts have placed the blame for the token’s crash on the actions of the project’s leader, Do Kwon, in the opinion piece, the Chinese author appears to attribute the token’s fall mainly to the raising of interest rates by the U.S. Federal Reserve. Explaining how the rate rise caused the token to plummet, the author wrote:

Since the beginning of this year, the Federal Reserve has launched an interest rate hike cycle, and global liquidity has tightened. Especially in early May, the Federal Reserve raised interest rates by 50 basis points at a time, which had a negative impact on capital and market sentiment, and virtual currencies were the first to bear the brunt.

Virtual Currency and the Chinese Law

Following the crash of the two Terra tokens, some within the crypto community are still trying to piece together what may have caused the spectacular collapse. However, others have already accused two firms, Blackrock and Citadel, of being behind LUNA’s woes. These allegations have been rejected by the firms.

The Chinese author, in the meantime, claims in the piece that the involvement of investment giants in crypto markets “can lead to violent fluctuations in currency values, triggering a large number of sell-offs.”

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Hualin also reiterated that virtual currency transactions are not protected by Chinese law. These comments appear to contradict the recent Shanghai High People’s Court judgment affirming bitcoin to be a virtual asset protected by Chinese law.

The author ends the article by urging investors to “remain rational, promptly eliminate the greed of bottom-hunting and get rich overnight, and stay away from related trading speculations, otherwise it is very likely that ‘currency will go to the fortune.’”

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ban, Bitcoin, Blackrock, China, crypto ban, Crypto markets, do kwon, LUNA, Shanghai High People’s Court, Terra Blockchain, UST, Virtual Currency

What are your thoughts on this story? Tell us what you think in the comments section below.

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Terence Zimwara

Terence Zimwara is a Zimbabwe award-winning journalist, author and writer. He has written extensively about the economic troubles of some African countries as well as how digital currencies can provide Africans with an escape route.

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Disclaimer: This article is for informational purposes only. It is not a direct offer or solicitation of an offer to buy or sell, or a recommendation or endorsement of any products, services, or companies. Bitcoin.com does not provide investment, tax, legal, or accounting advice. Neither the company nor the author is responsible, directly or indirectly, for any damage or loss caused or alleged to be caused by or in connection with the use of or reliance on any content, goods or services mentioned in this article.

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National Bank Of Ukraine Temporarily Bans Cross-Border Crypto Purchases With Hryvnia

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National Bank Of Ukraine Temporarily Bans Cross-Border Crypto Purchases With Hryvnia

The central bank of Ukraine has introduced additional restrictions on international transactions that will prevent Ukrainians from buying crypto assets abroad with the national fiat. The measures are intended to reduce capital outflow amid an ongoing military conflict with Russia.

Ukraine Citizens Not Allowed to Buy Crypto Abroad From Local Currency Accounts

The National Bank of Ukraine (NBU) has issued a notice detailing the introduction of certain restrictions on cross-border transactions that private individuals can make. The move aims to curb the “unproductive outflow of capital from the country under martial law,” the regulator stated.

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Ukrainian residents will be allowed to acquire assets that can be directly converted to cash, or quasi cash transactions, using only their own foreign currency up to the equivalent of 100,000 hryvnia ($3,400) per month. The limit applies to cross-border peer-to-peer (P2P) transfers as well. These non-cash transfers can be carried out with cards issued to accounts in foreign currency.

The quasi cash transactions include a range of operations like replenishment of electronic wallets or forex accounts, payment of traveler’s checks, and purchase of virtual assets, the monetary authority elaborated. The new regulations come after when, in March, the largest commercial bank in Ukraine, Privatbank, halted hryvnia transfers to cryptocurrency exchanges.

In order to facilitate financial support for Ukrainian refugees abroad, the NBU allows Hryvnia account holders to make cross-border P2P transfers within the 100,000-hryvnia monthly limit. However, the central bank emphasized that quasi cash transactions from these accounts in national currency are temporarily prohibited.

The National Bank of Ukraine insists that these rules will help to improve the country’s foreign exchange market, which it considers a precondition for easing restrictions in the future. The regulator is also convinced that the measures will reduce the pressure on Ukraine’s foreign currency reserves.

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The Ukrainian foreign exchange market has processed significant volumes of foreign currency purchases by local banks for settlements with international payment systems. Such transfers reached $1.7 billion in March. The demand for these settlements stems from the increased use of cards issued by Ukrainian banks to accounts in national currency for the purchase of goods and services outside the country.

Bank cards are also employed in quasi cash transactions that the NBU says are mainly carried out to circumvent its restrictions, particularly for investing abroad which is prohibited under the current martial law. The bank notes, however, that the new limitations do not apply to the use of cards to pay for goods and services in Ukraine and outside the country.

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ban, Bank, Capital Outflow, Card Payments, Central Bank, Crypto, Crypto Purchases, Cryptocurrencies, Cryptocurrency, limitations, Martial Law, national bank, Payments, prohibition, restrictions, rules, Russia, transactions, Ukraine, ukrainian, War

What do you think about the new restrictions on crypto purchases imposed by the National Bank of Ukraine? Share your thoughts in the comments section below.

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Lubomir Tassev

Lubomir Tassev is a journalist from tech-savvy Eastern Europe who likes Hitchens’s quote: “Being a writer is what I am, rather than what I do.” Besides crypto, blockchain and fintech, international politics and economics are two other sources of inspiration.

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Image Credits: Shutterstock, Pixabay, Wiki Commons

Disclaimer: This article is for informational purposes only. It is not a direct offer or solicitation of an offer to buy or sell, or a recommendation or endorsement of any products, services, or companies. Bitcoin.com does not provide investment, tax, legal, or accounting advice. Neither the company nor the author is responsible, directly or indirectly, for any damage or loss caused or alleged to be caused by or in connection with the use of or reliance on any content, goods or services mentioned in this article.

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