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Bank of Russia

Russian Ruble Taps 7-Year High Against The US Dollar — Economist Says ‘Don’t Ignore The Exchange Rate’

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Russian Ruble Taps 7-Year High Against The US Dollar — Economist Says ‘Don’t Ignore The Exchange Rate’

Recent news reports have detailed that Russia’s fiat currency, the ruble, was the best-performing currency worldwide and the articles explained that American economists were perplexed by the trend. On Monday, the Russian ruble rose to 55.47 per dollar, which was the highest increase since 2015. While many have dismissed the ruble’s exchange rate, Charles Lichfield, the Atlantic Council’s Geoeconomics Center deputy director, published an editorial called: “Don’t ignore the exchange rate: How a strong ruble can shield Russia.”

Russia’s Ruble Climbs Higher — Report Says ‘Putin Is Having the Last Laugh’

The financial sanctions against Russia are seemingly not affecting the transcontinental country as much as Western media has portrayed during the past few months. On Monday, the Russian ruble tapped a price high against the U.S. dollar and it was the highest rise since 2015. There have been many reports from economists and analysts that have said Russia’s financial books are cooked and most of the ruble’s strength is simply smoke and mirrors. One Youtuber claims that while the ruble looks strong, most of the strength is bolstered by manipulation.

USD/RUB chart on June 21, 2022. One candle wick indicates the ruble spiked well above the 55.47 per dollar all-time high at the 155 range.

Youtuber Jake Broe told his 146,000 subscribers that the “Russian economy is currently tanking, inflation is high, unemployment is going up, wages are going down, the GDP of the Russian economy is collapsing.” However, Broe’s arguments could also be said about the United States as the American economy seems to be heading toward a recession, inflation is the highest in 40 years, jobless claims in the U.S. have risen as productivity is down, and the U.S. economy’s GDP shrank significantly in Q1 2022.

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Broe says that the Russian government and central bank are manipulating things, which has made the ruble look strong. Yet, arguably, U.S. politicians and the Federal Reserve could also be accused of manipulation and spreading unreliable information. Other reports that do not leverage Broe’s biased talking points indicate that sanctions against Russia have failed miserably. A report published by armstrongeconomics.com says the Russian oil boycott is not working and “Putin is having the last laugh as he is now selling more oil at a higher price point.”

Armstrongeconomics.com author Martin Armstrong added:

In April, Russian oil exports rose by 620,000 b/d to 8.1 million b/d. India (+730,000 b/d) and Turkey (+180,000 b/d) helped to offset the international embargo, while the EU remained the largest importer despite a sharp reduction in shipments. The IEA reported that Russian oil exports rose over 50% YoY during the first four months of the year — The boycott has completely backfired on the West and has helped strengthen the Russian economy.

Report Shows India Buys Oil From Russia, Refines It, Then Sells It to Europe for Profit — European Union Commission President Predicts Oil Sanctions Could Backfire

Additionally, Russia has been keeping its financial dealings obscure as the country announced monthly figures on government spending would no longer be disclosed. Russia’s Finance Ministry told the press the country needed to “minimize the risk of the imposition of additional sanctions.” Bitcoin.com News reported two weeks ago that numerous countries are not adhering to the West’s sanctions and have been purchasing oil from the Russian Federation. For instance, India is reportedly obtaining oil from Russia and after the oil is refined, the country has been selling it to Europe for a profit.

New Delhi: India is importing crude oil from Russia & re-exporting it at much higher prices to US, France, Italy & UK. – CREA report shows.

— South Asia Index (@SouthAsiaIndex) June 14, 2022

China has been purchasing oil from Russia as well, and a number of oil refineries are forced to purchase oil from the transcontinental country. For instance, Italy’s largest refinery ISAB has been forced to source crude oil from Russia because banks stopped providing the company with credit. China is the largest single buyer of Russian oil and has been since 2021, and data shows the country obtains 1.6 million barrels per day from Russia on average. Meanwhile, oil is becoming scarcer in Europe as warnings say Britain could face massive grid blackouts. The financial newspaper the Economist insists Europe is suffering through “a severe energy-price shock”

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The inconvenient truth those citing Russia’s GDP size fail to grasp:

If we subtract Russian energy from the mix of global energy supplies, global oil & gas prices will quickly spike to levels that collapse the entire global economy, & USD-centric debt markets & financial system. pic.twitter.com/dZiEaZXh3H

— Luke Gromen (@LukeGromen) February 21, 2022

Moreover, two weeks ago, Charles Lichfield, the Atlantic Council’s Geoeconomics Center deputy director, published an editorial that says people should not dismiss the ruble exchange rate. Lichfield’s article says Western governments claimed that eventually, Russia’s economy would ultimately fail but he thinks things need to be reassessed. “The Russian financial system may have withstood the initial shock — but a fall in gross domestic product (GDP) and crippling input shortages, they claimed, would force Moscow to eventually de-escalate as the war entered a grinding phase — But it’s time to reassess this stance,” Lichfield wrote.

Russia’s economy will fail as a result of their “war”. They will not be in a bargaining position soon…. Just kick out their diplomats. https://t.co/Yx2Bn4ACaa

— J Burgess – I am what I am. (@Gooddem4ever) April 5, 2022

Government officials predicted that the energy sanctions could backfire and may not necessarily work. During an interview in May, the European Union Commission president Ursula Von Der Leyen described how the energy sanctions could backfire. Von Der Leyen said that if countries “immediately” sanctioned Russian oil imports, Vladimir Putin “would be able to take the oil that he does not sell to the European Union to the world market, where the prices will increase, and [he will] sell it for more.”

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Bank of Russia, Central Bank, Charles Lichfield, China, conflict, Crude Oil, cut rate, economics, EU, Gas, India, interest rate, Martin Armstrong, OIL, Peace Talks, rouble, ruble, ruble crash, ruble falls, ruble plunges, Ruble Rises, Ruble strength, Russia, russia bank run, Russia Ruble, russian bank run, russian sanctions, Sanctions, Ukraine, Ursula Von Der Leyen, Vladimir Putin, War, Western Allies, Youtuber Jake Broe

What do you think about the Russian ruble’s market performance and the theories on why it is doing so well? Do you think the Russian ruble is being propped up by the country’s officials or do you think the fiat currency is strong? Let us know what you think about this subject in the comments section below.

Jamie Redman

Jamie Redman is the News Lead at Bitcoin.com News and a financial tech journalist living in Florida. Redman has been an active member of the cryptocurrency community since 2011. He has a passion for Bitcoin, open-source code, and decentralized applications. Since September 2015, Redman has written more than 5,000 articles for Bitcoin.com News about the disruptive protocols emerging today.

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Image Credits: Shutterstock, Pixabay, Wiki Commons

Disclaimer: This article is for informational purposes only. It is not a direct offer or solicitation of an offer to buy or sell, or a recommendation or endorsement of any products, services, or companies. Bitcoin.com does not provide investment, tax, legal, or accounting advice. Neither the company nor the author is responsible, directly or indirectly, for any damage or loss caused or alleged to be caused by or in connection with the use of or reliance on any content, goods or services mentioned in this article.

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Bank of Russia

Crypto Payments Possible If They Don’t Penetrate Russia’s Financial System, Central Bank Says

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Crypto Payments Possible If They Don’t Penetrate Russia’s Financial System, Central Bank Says

Cryptocurrencies can be used for international payments if they don’t penetrate the Russian financial system, the head of Bank of Russia has stated. The governor also insisted that the digital assets should not be traded on platforms operating inside the country.

Bank of Russia Chair Ready to Accept Cryptocurrency Payments for International Settlements

Cryptocurrencies can be employed in international payments if they do not “penetrate” the financial system of the Russian Federation, according to Elvira Nabiullina, governor of the Central Bank of Russia (CBR). The official added that these digital assets are subject to high price fluctuations and emphasized:

Cryptocurrency should not be traded on organized marketplaces because this asset is too volatile, too risky for potential investors.

Quoted by RBC Crypto, the banker said that digital coins listed on Russian exchanges must be compliant with all regulations designed to protect investors. Hence, the projects behind the traded assets should have a prospectus, a responsible person, and meet information disclosure requirements.

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Nabiullina’s statement comes after last month when her deputy, Ksenia Yudaeva, announced that the CBR is not against the use of decentralized digital assets in “international transactions and the international financial infrastructure,” signaling a softening of the regulator’s stance on crypto payments amid expanding financial sanctions on Russia.

A provision allowing crypto payments in foreign trade has since been added to a new draft law, expected to comprehensively regulate Russia’s crypto sector. The bill “On Digital Currency” is likely to be filed with the State Duma in September, the head of the house’s Financial Market Committee Anatoly Aksakov revealed this week.

The legislation has been delayed by the ongoing debate on the future of cryptocurrencies in the Russian Federation, which led to multiple revisions in the past few months since it was submitted by the Ministry of Finance in February. Aksakov told the daily Izvestia that lawmakers are now leaning towards stricter rules for the crypto market.

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Bank of Russia, CBR, Central Bank, Chair, Crypto, crypto payments, Cryptocurrencies, Cryptocurrency, Elvira Nabiullina, Governor, international payments, international settlements, Nabiullina, Payments, Russia, russian, Settlements

Do you think Russia will employ cryptocurrencies for international payments? Share your expectations in the comments section below.

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Lubomir Tassev

Lubomir Tassev is a journalist from tech-savvy Eastern Europe who likes Hitchens’s quote: “Being a writer is what I am, rather than what I do.” Besides crypto, blockchain and fintech, international politics and economics are two other sources of inspiration.

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Image Credits: Shutterstock, Pixabay, Wiki Commons, ID1974

Disclaimer: This article is for informational purposes only. It is not a direct offer or solicitation of an offer to buy or sell, or a recommendation or endorsement of any products, services, or companies. Bitcoin.com does not provide investment, tax, legal, or accounting advice. Neither the company nor the author is responsible, directly or indirectly, for any damage or loss caused or alleged to be caused by or in connection with the use of or reliance on any content, goods or services mentioned in this article.

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Bank of Russia

American Economists Are Baffled By An ‘Unusual Situation’ As Russia’s Ruble Is The World’s Best Performing Fiat Currency

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American Economists Are Baffled By An ‘Unusual Situation’ As Russia’s Ruble Is The World’s Best Performing Fiat Currency

Two months after the Russian ruble fell below a U.S. penny, the transcontinental country’s fiat currency is the best performing currency worldwide. American economists are baffled by the “unusual situation” because a country facing stiff sanctions typically sees its fiat currency decline in value, but Russia’s ruble has done the exact opposite.

Russia’s Ruble Outshines the Euro and Dollar — Transcontinental Country’s Fiat Currency Shows Resiliency

On February 28, 2022, Bitcoin.com News reported on the Russian ruble sinking to record lows, and citizens started to withdraw lots of cash causing what many reports called a “bank run.” At the time, Russia was hit with strict financial sanctions from countries opposed to the war in Ukraine. Furthermore, the United States, the European Commission, and Western allies imposed restrictions on the Bank of Russia’s international reserves.

However, during the second week of April 2022, Bitcoin.com News reported on the country’s central bank slashing rates and pegging the ruble to gold. At the time, Russia’s central bank pegged the price of RUB to 5,000 rubles for a gram of gold. Russia also made it so “unfriendly” countries are forced to pay for gas with the ruble. Numerous international buyers are complying with the rule and paying for petro products in rubles. The country’s central bank also slashed Russia’s benchmark bank rate as well.

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Chart via Bloomberg.

That week in April, the Russian ruble rebounded to pre-war levels and the fiat currency has shown resilience ever since then. In recent times, various headlines from Western-based media outlets have shown that the Russian ruble is the world’s best-performing fiat currency today. Speaking with CBS, Jeffrey Frankel, a professor of capital formation and growth at the Harvard Kennedy School remarked that “it’s an unusual situation” in regard to the ruble rise. The ruble has recorded record highs against the eurozone’s euro and the U.S. dollar.

In the same report, Tatiana Orlova, the lead emerging markets economist at Oxford Economics, said that the increase in commodity prices has been attributed to the ruble’s resiliency. “Commodity prices are currently sky-high, and even though there is a drop in the volume of Russian exports due to embargoes and sanctioning, the increase in commodity prices more than compensates for these drops,” Orlova explained. Orlova further detailed to CBS that there’s been a huge discrepancy between exports and imports in Russia. The Oxford economist added:

We have this coincidence that, as imports have collapsed, exports are soaring.

Orlova also discussed the capital controls Russia’s central bank implemented and how foreign holders of stocks and bonds cannot reap dividends internationally. “That used to be quite a significant source of outflows for currency from Russia — now that channel is closed,” the Oxford economist concluded.

Meanwhile, in the United States, the Biden administration is struggling with hot inflation and the president has a hard time discussing the issue, according to a report from the New York Times’ contributors Zolan Kanno-Youngs and Jeanna Smialek. Biden is claiming that “America is in a stronger economic position today than just about any other country in the world.” Biden continues to blame the Russian president Vladimir Putin for the U.S. gas hikes and calls it the “Putin Price Hike.”

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Bank of Russia, Central Bank, Coal, conflict, Crude Oil, cut rate, economics, EU, Gas, gold backed ruble, gold parity, gold ruble, interest rate, OIL, Peace Talks, rouble, ruble, ruble crash, ruble falls, ruble gold, ruble plunges, Ruble Rises, Ruble strength, Russia, russia bank run, Russia Ruble, russian bank run, russian sanctions, Sanctions, slashed rate, Ukraine, Vladimir Putin, War, Western Allies

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What do you think about the Russian ruble’s performance in 2022? Let us know what you think about this subject in the comments section below.

Jamie Redman

Jamie Redman is the News Lead at Bitcoin.com News and a financial tech journalist living in Florida. Redman has been an active member of the cryptocurrency community since 2011. He has a passion for Bitcoin, open-source code, and decentralized applications. Since September 2015, Redman has written more than 5,000 articles for Bitcoin.com News about the disruptive protocols emerging today.

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Image Credits: Shutterstock, Pixabay, Wiki Commons

Disclaimer: This article is for informational purposes only. It is not a direct offer or solicitation of an offer to buy or sell, or a recommendation or endorsement of any products, services, or companies. Bitcoin.com does not provide investment, tax, legal, or accounting advice. Neither the company nor the author is responsible, directly or indirectly, for any damage or loss caused or alleged to be caused by or in connection with the use of or reliance on any content, goods or services mentioned in this article.

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Bank Of Russia Steps Up Efforts To Issue Digital Ruble Due To Sanctions

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Bank Of Russia Steps Up Efforts To Issue Digital Ruble Due To Sanctions

The Central Bank of Russia (CBR) has accelerated the development of its digital ruble in response to Western sanctions. The monetary authority now intends to pilot transactions with the new version of the national fiat in early 2023 instead of 2024, as originally planned.

CBR to Launch Transactions, Smart Contracts With Digital Ruble as Early as Next Year

Sanctions imposed over Moscow’s invasion of Ukraine have convinced the Bank of Russia to speed up the development of the digital version of the ruble, the Russian-language edition of Forbes reported, quoting CBR’s First Deputy Chairman Olga Skorobogatova. She revealed this during a meeting organized by the Association of Banks of Russia.

The high-ranking official remarked that Russia’s central bank had initially scheduled the digital ruble pilot with real transactions and users for 2024 but it has been decided to launch the project in April 2023. At the same time, the regulator also wants to start implementing smart contracts based on the digital ruble infrastructure.

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Last spring, the Central Bank of Russia announced that the digital ruble’s prototype will be ready by the end of 2021 and devoted 2022 to trials with the participation of commercial banks. It started testing the platform in February of this year and announced the first successful transfers between individual wallets later that month.

The users were able to open digital ruble wallets through mobile apps, exchange regular electronic money from their bank accounts for digital rubles, and then transfer the coins between themselves, the CBR detailed. At the time, Skorobogatova assured that the digital currency transactions will be free of charge for all Russians and available in every region of the country.

A dozen Russian banks have so far applied to join the pilot group for the project and three of them have already connected their systems to the central bank digital currency (CBDC) platform. Two of the financial institutions have successfully completed a full cycle of digital ruble transfers between clients, the CBR revealed in its announcement.

Bank of Russia started testing the digital ruble amid disagreements with the Ministry of Finance over the future of cryptocurrencies in Russia. While the ministry wants them legalized and regulated, the monetary authority proposed a blanket ban on crypto-related activities. Discussions on the matter continue in Moscow but the central bank maintains its hardline stance, insisting the legalization of their circulation brings risks for the country’s financial stability and its citizens.

Forbes quotes Fitch analysts who expect the CBR to continue to advocate a prohibition of decentralized cryptocurrencies in order to make room for the development of its own digital currency. They also suggest that the emergence of a digital ruble could lead to an outflow of funds from deposits in the banking system, increased competition in the financial market, and rising interest rates.

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Bank of Russia, CBDC, CBR, Central Bank, Crypto, Cryptocurrencies, Cryptocurrency, Digital Currency, digital ruble, invasion, pilot, pilot project, Regulation, Regulations, Russia, russian, Sanctions, Testing, trials, Ukraine, War

Do you think Bank of Russia will manage to issue the digital ruble by April 2023? Tell us in the comments section below.

Lubomir Tassev

Lubomir Tassev is a journalist from tech-savvy Eastern Europe who likes Hitchens’s quote: “Being a writer is what I am, rather than what I do.” Besides crypto, blockchain and fintech, international politics and economics are two other sources of inspiration.

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Image Credits: Shutterstock, Pixabay, Wiki Commons

Disclaimer: This article is for informational purposes only. It is not a direct offer or solicitation of an offer to buy or sell, or a recommendation or endorsement of any products, services, or companies. Bitcoin.com does not provide investment, tax, legal, or accounting advice. Neither the company nor the author is responsible, directly or indirectly, for any damage or loss caused or alleged to be caused by or in connection with the use of or reliance on any content, goods or services mentioned in this article.

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